Organization Skills for Children with Aspergers

aspergersI recently had a client with a “chronically messy” daughter who we later found out had Aspergers. After doing some research on how Aspergers affects organisation skills, I came across a website called My Aspergers Child which had some great tips I thought I would share with my readers: 

Below are some ways in which children and teens with Aspergers and High-Functioning Autism (HFA) can organize and prioritize daily activities and tasks. At first, parents may need to have a lot of involvement introducing the techniques and helping their child to get used to using them. Also, the techniques can be used in more than one place (e.g., at home and at school). 

Therefore, it is important that everyone who is using them (e.g., parents, babysitters, teachers, friends, etc.) uses them consistently. Over time, most children and teens with Aspergers will be able to use the strategies independently (although some may always need a certain degree of support). 

Organizations Skills

 1. Be a coach: For the best results, you’ll want to be a low-key coach. You can ask questions that will help your child get on track and stay there. But use these questions only to prompt their thought process about what needs to be done.

 2. Color coding for tasks: Colors can be used to indicate the importance or significance of tasks (e.g., chores, homework, etc.), and therefore help to prioritize tasks and work through them in a logical sequence. For example, a note on the child’s bulletin board written in red could mean “urgent.” A note on the bulletin board written in green could mean “pending.” And a note written in blue is not important or has no timescale attached to it.

 3. Lists: Lists, both written and pictorial, can help children with Aspergers in the same way as color coding. Lists can also be a good way of (a) registering achievements (e.g., by crossing something off when he/she has completed the task) and (b) reassuring the child that he/she is getting things done.

 4. Make a plan: Decide on one thing to focus on first. You can come up with three things and let your youngster choose one (e.g., if homework or a particular chore has been a problem, that’s the natural place to begin).

 5. Praise progress, but don’t go overboard: The self-satisfaction children will feel will be a more powerful motivator.

 6. Sell your youngster on the idea of “staying organized”: Brainstorm about what might be easier or better if your youngster was more organized and focused. Maybe homework would get done faster, there would be more play time, and there would be less nagging about chores. Then there’s the added bonus of your youngster feeling proud and you being proud, too.

 7. Set expectations: Be clear, in a kind way, that you expect your children to work on these skills and that you’ll be there to help along the way.

 8. Social stories and comic strip conversations: Social stories and comic strip conversations can be a really good way of illustrating the consequences of an action and can help children to understand why it’s good to be organized (e.g., what might happen if the child doesn’t get his/her homework done).

 9. Task boxes, envelopes and files: Children can store work or belongings in set places, so that they aren’t misplaced or forgotten.

 10. Teaching materials: You may find that certain teaching materials (e.g., sequence cards, games, timers, clocks, etc.) help some Aspergers kids to understand the concept of time and sequences. Materials like this can be adapted and used in different places (e.g., home and school).

Read the entire article here. 

Image courtesy of:  My Aspergers Child.com

 

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